Petrichor: the smell of rain

rainy day in Cuba (08 August 2011)

rainy day in Cuba (08 August 2011)

A writer – and, I believe, generally all persons – must think that whatever happens to him or her is a resource. All things have been given to us for a purpose, and an artist must feel this more intensely. All that happens to us, including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments, all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art. (Jorge Luis Borges)

The sinews and ligaments of this post – its interconnections, if you prefer – are somewhat tenuous. (Our ability to stay alive is tenuous.) There is no great need for the reader to make any real effort to fathom any of it.

Jorge Luis Borges: an Argentine writer of (among other things) short stories “interconnected by common themes such as dreams, labyrinths, libraries, mirrors, animals, fictional writers, philosophy, religion and God.” (Wikipedia: Jorge Luis Borges)

According to Bella Jozef, his work embraces the “character of unreality in all literature”. (Wikipedia: Jorge Luis Borges)

The image was shot in Cuba Mall, Wellington, in the last month of winter 2011. The word “petrichor” refers to the smell of rain on dry ground. The word derives from two Greek words: “petra” = stone; “ichor” = the blood of gods and goddesses (from a video titled 48 things you didn’t know had names on mentafloss.com).

Liberté! Egalité! Fraternité!

"La Marseillaise"

“La Marseillaise”

Yesterday, on the eve of Bastille Day, I experienced “patriotism” more profoundly than ever before. The agent of my enlightenment was Mireille Mathieu – and I have not a drop of French blood. 😉 PS: I was listening to a radio programme of music by French composers on Radio New Zealand Concert.

This post appeared on a certain Facebook page on 14 July, but I did not have the opportunity to post it here at that time … so I have adjusted the publication date.

Michael Schultheiß / Schultze / Praetorius

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Born on 15 February 1571, Creuzburg an der Werra, Michael Praetorius died in Wolfenbüttel on his 50th birthday, 15 February 1621.

According to Wikipedia, he was born Michael Schultze, the youngest son of a Lutheran pastor, in Creuzburg, in present-day Thuringia. The CyberHymnal says his real name was Michael Schultheiß (German for ‘mayor’, which in La­tin is ‘Praetorius’).

Wikipedia adds: “His family name in German appears in various forms including Schultze, Schulte, Schultheiss, Schulz and Schulteis. Praetorius was the conventional Latinized form of this family name.”

The Dances from Terpsichore, a compendium of over 300 instrumental dances, is his most widely-known work – and, regrettably, his sole surviving secular work. His harmonization of Es ist ein Ros entsprungen (Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming) – written by Praetorius in 1609 – is a particular favourite.

There is no try

“Be the person you are,” Osho urged his followers. “Never try to be another.”

“Do or do not,” Yoda told Luke Skywalker. “There is no try.”

Osho talked about “accepting the responsibility of being oneself, whatsoever the cost. Risking all to be oneself …”

But take careful note: no way do I see this as an excuse for behaving badly! Accepting responsibility for my actions is crucial.

And do you remember how the scene ends?

“I don’t …  I don’t believe it,” Luke admits.

“That is why you fail,” says Yoda.