Verdigris

verdigris (09 March 2015)

verdigris (09 March 2015)

“Natural or artificially created coatings of verdigris is commonly used as a patina to protect copper or bronze objects, especially in architecture. … Until the 19th century, verdigris was the most vibrant green pigment available and was frequently used in painting.” (Wikipedia).

The corner plate pictured here protects the beautiful stonework of a doorway in Maginnity Street, Wellington.

Fallen frond

fallen nīkau frond (01 February 2015)

fallen nīkau frond (01 February 2015)

There are nīkau palms in a number of locations around Wellington city – as well as the iconic sculptural versions which feature in and around Civic Square.

The fallen nīkau frond shown here is from one of the palms in a paved area on the corner of Victoria and Manners Streets.

“The nīkau (Rhopalostylis sapida) is a palm tree endemic to New Zealand, and the only palm native to New Zealand” (Wikipedia).

Repaint your city

repaint your city

repaint your city

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Urban environments offer me the possibility to explore my own sense of space. In doing so, light always triggers me. I’m fascinated by the way light is able to change the geometry of a certain space, which looks different one minute to the next, offering new geometric shapes all over again. (Wilma Eras, on her blog, Erassima)

A photographer friend commented to me recently: “Not many people can appreciate abstracts.” As one strongly attracted to abstract photography – and to abstract art in general – I’m not convinced he’s right. But then, the term “abstract” has different meanings for different people.

“Abstraction exists along a continuum” – as the Wikipedia article on abstract art so succinctly puts it. For me, Rudolph Arnheim’s pithy summation works equally well in relation to abstract photography: “Abstract art uses a visual language of form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world.” (Rudolph Arnheim, in Visual Thinking)

The proliferation of internet-based photo-media makes it increasingly easy for anyone who, like me, has greedy eyes to spend hour after hour in front of a computer screen. But I do have my favourites.

From time to time I look in on Erassima, the blog of Wilma Eras – who hails from the Netherlands. Responses to her image, “repaint your city”, include the following from Richard Guest: “Lovely balance between abstraction and physicality – I really like them!” That balance is something I really value, too.

In February this year, a blog calling itself Red Square Gallery featured a folio of photos Wilma described as “Urban scenes painted by shadows.”

Graffiti, tags and street art seem to be among the current hot attractions for photographers. But few of them seem keen to engage explicitly in the ongoing anger-charged discourse on the subject of “tagging as vandalism”. But that is another topic … for another post.

Cross light

cross light (09 Apr 2012)

cross light (09 Apr 2012)

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St Peter’s Apartments, opposite the Anglican Church, Wellington. It was this image, and not the green man, that persuaded me to cross Willis Street this morning.

Monday morning, Easter Weekend, zero traffic … who needs a green man?

Berlin Black and White

Everything seems to need tidying up from time to time; lawns need mowing, roses need pruning, rugs need beating, attics need emptying …

My Blogroll was overdue for a bit of work: several names on my list had fallen silent, and a couple were heading places that didn’t interest me.

Rather than delete anyone, I’ve made those blogs invisible.

Knut Skjærven

Knut Skjærven

I’ve also added a new name: Berlin Black and White, by Norwegian Knut Skjærven, a free-lance researcher, photographer, writer and blogger who lives in Copenhagen, Denmark. “This blog has a simple mission: To show black and white photographs from Berlin. However, it is also a project in a larger context. I will tell you more about that later.”

Still in exploration mode, I’m immediately attracted to Skjærven’s style, which boldly juxtaposes abstract and representational forms within a single image.

Greyscale steps

In photography and computing, a grayscale or greyscale digital image is an image in which the value of each pixel is a single sample, that is, it carries only intensity information. Images of this sort, also known as black-and-white, are composed exclusively of shades of gray, varying from black at the weakest intensity to white at the strongest. (Wikipedia)

greyscale steps (05 Jan 2012)

greyscale steps (05 Jan 2012)

Although actually a full-colour image, not a greyscale image, the palette of this photograph is quite narrow. For me, much of its appeal lies in its frugal simplicity.

(Location: outside State Insurance Tower, Wellington)